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Rosa Parks Quotes, Some Incident About Civil Rights

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Rosa Parks Quotes, Some Incident About Civil Rights: Rosa Parks, paradoxically, took a position by sitting down. During her daily commute from Montgomery Fair department store to her home on Cleveland Avenue.

The 42-year-old seamstress was asked by bus driver James Blake to move to back of the bus so a white passenger can take her place.

For all intents and purposes, Rosalynn didn’t sit in the first 10 rows, which were designated for whites. The driver, however, asked everyone in Parks’ row to move back as the bus became overcrowded.

Rosa Parks Quotes, Some Incident About Civil Rights

Rosa Parks

Incident

However, while the other three African-Americans complied, Parks remained motionless.

Ultimately, she is jail for her defiance, but it launch her career as one of the most vital civil rights activists in American history. The African-American community came together on December 5, 1955.

The day of Rosa Parks’ trial, as a show of solidarity and continue to stay off buses for 381 days, which become known as the Montgomery Bus Boycott despite the fact that she is release on bail the same night.

The effects were felt by everyone in the neighbourhood, as well as the bus system. A year later, on November 13th, the Supreme Court ruled that segregation on public transportation was unconstitutional under US constitutional law.

Fight For Equality

However, the struggle of Rosa Parks did not end there. She continued to fight for equality even after facing financial and health problems.

As a result of the boycott and her relocation to Detroit. During the boycotts, she teamed up with Martin Luther King Jr. Who had previously worked with Rosa Parks. To get him to come to Detroit and endorse African American Congressman John Conyers.

After writing Rosa Parks, My Story (1992), in which she recounted her life’s events. She followed it up with another autobiography, Quiet Strength (1995).

Her next major honours came in 1996. When she is presenting with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Followed by the Congressional Gold Medal a year later.

In 2005, she passed away at the age of 92. But her legacy as one of the most significant African American women in history lives on.

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